Anticipation Calendar

The Anticipation Calendar is the entry-level timepiece, and is the most basic type (conceptually) of calendars. Students who use an anticipation  level calendar are present in the “Now”,  meaning their concept of time only relates to this moment. They are not able to conceptualize very far into the future, or very far into the past.

An example of an anticipation calendar with high contrast baskets set against blue background material. The present and past containers have distinct shapes and colors.
An example of an anticipation calendar with high contrast baskets set against blue background material. The present and past containers have distinct shapes and colors.

Prerequisites for an Anticipation Calendar

    • Student demonstrates recognition of some of the people, locations, sounds, scents and actions associated with a couple of daily routines.
    • Student demonstrates knowledge about the function of one or two objects in a familiar routine.
    • Student shows that he/she anticipates a few steps while doing a familiar routine indicating memory of the routine.

Characteristics of an Anticipation Calendar

    • An example of an anticipation calendar on a desktop, referred to as the student's calendar station. Note the  green wicker basket represents the present and the rectangular metal tray represents the past.
      An example of an anticipation calendar on a desktop, referred to as the student’s calendar station. Note the green wicker basket represents the present and the rectangular metal tray represents the past.
      Provide a timepiece for kids who are in the “Now”.
    • Help students to anticipate what event will happen next.
    • Helps a student know that an activity is “finished”. 
    • Help students put a label on the present event.
    • Represents a specific time frame: immediate past and the immediate future.
    • Uses only two containers that are distinctively different from the child’s perspective; that is, visually, tactually depending on vision. An example of this can be seen in the picture to the right. 
 

Instructional Strategies Menu

    • Assessment
    • Communication Overview
    • Calendars
      • Time Concepts
      • Sequencing
      • Using Calendars to Expand Concepts
      • Calendars Support Social Interaction
      • A Form of Literacy
      • Anticipation
      • Daily
      • Weekly
      • Monthly
      • Timelines
    • Choice-making
    • Concept Development & Experiential Learning
    • Interaction and Bonding
      • Factors to Consider
      • Avoid Pitfalls
      • Hand Under Hand
      • Building Security
      • Imitative Play Strategies
      • Turn-taking Play Strategies
      • Be a Good Playmate
      • Use Interaction to Teach
      • Additional Resources
    • Routines
      • Experiencing Routines
      • Literacy Related to Routines
      • Turn-taking Games
      • Level 1 Routines (Sharing the Work)
      • Level 2 Routines (Participation with Support)
      • Level 3 Routines (Independent)

 

How to use the Anticipation Calendar

    • Present symbol and allow the student to explore it as they choose.
    • Label it/say what it represents in terms of an activity and say “now”, then go do that activity immediately.
    • When the activity is complete, put the symbol for that activity in finished box and say/sign “finished”.
    • Using the Anticipation calendar, present the next activity symbol

The anticipation system is the entry level calendar system. If the student is not ready for this, then the emphasis should be placed on developing participation in routines, engaging in interactions and the resonance level of van Dijk methodology.

Videos: Anticipation Calendar

Here you will see a teacher working with a student who is at the anticipation level. Her concept of time is limited to what’s happening now. The activity starts by highlighting the symbol in the now basket, which represents the specific activity. It will finish with the same symbol being placed in the finished basket. 

 

Resources

Guide to Selecting Time Frames for Calendar Systems by Robbie Blaha